11.21.2021

Fundamentals of Ocean pH

R. Cohen and W. Happer – September 18, 2015 (republished November 21, 2021) 1 Introduction We are often told that the CO2 released from burning fossil fuels will cause dangerous ocean acidification. Actually the oceans will remain comfortably alkaline and hospitable to life for the foreseeable future. This brief note is a quantitative review of… Continue Reading
11.12.2020

New-tech American Coal-fired Electricity for Africa: Clean Air, Indoors and Out

Introduction Human health, morbidity, mortality and longevity are significantly impacted by climate. This review examines the evidence for past, present and possible future health impacts of climate change on disease and disease vectors, on extreme weather events, floods, droughts, heatwaves and wildfires, on food and famine, and on social and mental health. It will also... Continue Reading
7.23.2020

Do Government Policies Favoring Fossil Fuels Hamper the Development of Wind and Solar Power?

By Bruce Everett Ph.D. Executive Summary A number of studies claim that pervasive subsidies provide an unfair competitive advantage to fossil fuels over renewable energy. Many estimates have been made of the value of direct and indirect subsidies provided to fossil fuels, the most extreme being the 2015 study by the International Monetary Fund estimating... Continue Reading
6.1.2020

Ocean Health – Is there an “Acidification” problem?

The CO2 Coalition of climate scientists today released a White Paper analyzing decades of peer-reviewed research on the impact on the oceans of carbon dioxide emissions from the conversion of fossil fuels to energy.  Ocean Health – Is there an “Acidification”  problem? concludes that CO2 is an important plankton food that enriches sea life, and that the term “ocean acidification” is highly misleading.... Continue Reading
7.8.2019

The Social Cost of Carbon and Carbon Taxes – Pick a number, any number

The Social Cost of Carbon and Carbon Taxes – Pick a number, any number From the Executive Summary Leaving aside its scientific and economic uncertainties, the government’s Social Cost of Carbon is so sensitive to input assumptions that small, quite reasonable variations can produce almost any price you wish. As a result it is not… Continue Reading

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