Whither CO2? Seeking Science-Based Quantification of Carbon Cycle Uncertainty

By Roger M. Cooke and Michael Oppenheimer Globally, we are presently emitting approximately 10 Gigatonnes of carbon (GtC) annually. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 has an emissions trajectory according to which emissions worldwide will climb to 29 GtC per year in 2100. The more sanguine RCP 3 emissions 

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When Too Little CO2 Nearly Doomed Humanity

By Dennis Avery Aside from the expected protests of Al Gore and Leonard Di Caprio, the public didn’t seem to raise its CO2 anguish much above the Russians-election frenzy the media already had going. Statistician Bjorn Lomborg has already pointed out that the Paris CO2 emissions cuts would make only a 0.05 degree C difference in 

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Submit the Paris Treaty to the Senate

By Jon Basil Utley The so-called Paris “Treaty” has all sorts of grounds for complicated lawsuits to restrict America’s new found energy independence and growing massive natural-gas production. We need to get out from under it. Yet a weakened President Trump is hesitating while the global-warming lobby tries desperately to confound the issues. There have 

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NYT Peddles More Global Warming Science Without Numbers

By Robert Tracinski Recently, I noted the basic pattern of science reporting on global warming, particularly as practiced by The New York Times: feeding you an overall conclusion, illustrated with pretty pictures designed to make you feel like you’ve been given information—but withholding from you the real numbers you would need to actually evaluate and 

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Climate Editors Have a Meltdown

By Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. I’ll admit it: I would have found it fascinating to be party to the discussions earlier this year that led to oscillating headlines on the New York Times home page referring to the new EPA chief Scott Pruitt alternately as a “denier” or “skeptic.” At least it would have been 

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Making sense of the March for Science

By Steven T. Corneliussen Stanford University historian of science Robert Proctor reportedly sees the 22 April March for Science, held in Washington, DC, and hundreds of other locations worldwide, as “pretty unprecedented” among past analogues, thanks to “a broader perception of a massive attack” on “notions of truth that are sacred to the scientific community.” Why 

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Climate Accord Withdrawal Divides White House

By Larry Bell Earlier this month, a Politico headline reported a “White House showdown on Paris deal set for next week,” to resolve “simmering tensions” regarding “a major point of dispute between the moderate and nationalist wings of the White House.” That planned April 18 meeting was subsequently postponed indefinitely due to top official “scheduling 

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Bad Timing for a Carbon Tax

By Patrick J. Michaels Last week, The Washington Post reported an “administration official” indicated the Trump White House was considering a new tax on carbon dioxide emissions. This seems incredible for a number of reasons. It’s never a good time to champion a brand new tax, and recent science developments make it seem an especially 

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