Don’t Believe the Hype About a Carbon Tax

By Vance Ginn and Jonathan Williams Gasoline prices have been rising recently as tensions heighten in the global oil market. These increases may soon be exacerbated if some advocates of a carbon tax get their way. With its flawed assumptions and high costs, politicians should ignore the hype and just say no to a carbon 

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It Seems to Me: Carbon dioxide useful

By Bill Balgord President Trump decided not to participate in the Paris Climate Agreement based on evidence that reducing U.S. carbon dioxide emissions back to 1992 levels would impose heavy economic costs and unduly burden Americans. The effect of compliance would be to reduce temperature by an unmeasurably scant three-tenths of a degree Celsius in 

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Three Climate Change Questions Answered

by Wallace Manheimer A claimed nearly unanimous scientific consensus on fear of climate change has caused a push to substantially reduce or even eliminate the use of fossil fuel in favor of solar and wind.  But three crucial questions are: 1) is the scientific community really united?, 2) can solar and wind take over any time 

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You Wouldn’t Think Sea Level Is So Complex

This letter to the editors of the New York Times appeared on June 1, 2018. Since precise measurements began, mean atmospheric CO2 level has risen for 58 consecutive years, with no detectable acceleration of sea-level rise. Prof. Fred Singer (“The Sea Is Rising, but Not Because of Climate Change,” op-ed, May 16) is right: CO 

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Fundamental disagreement about climate change

by Judith Curry How can the fundamental disagreement about the causes of climate change be most effectively communicated? I have made numerous posts related to this topic, see especially The heart of the climate dynamics debate My specific motivation for this post is to encapsulate this disagreement in a single .ppt slide. My first crack 

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Energy Transitions? Not So Fast.

By Quinn Connelly Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel laureate in Economics, wrote a bestseller called “Thinking, Fast & Slow.” The book describes System 1 thinking, which is fast and automatic, and System 2 thinking, which is slow and deliberate. This framework can be used to understand two of today’s most prominent energy experts: David G. Victor 

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How Bad Is The Government’s Science?

By Peter Wood and David Randall Half the results published in peer-reviewed scientific journals are probably wrong. John Ioannidis, now a professor of medicine at Stanford, made headlines with that claim in 2005. Since then, researchers have confirmed his skepticism by trying—and often failing—to reproduce many influential journal articles. Slowly, scientists are internalizing the lessons 

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