Seeing the Forest AND the Trees: Predicting Forest Responses to Contrasting Climate Change Influences

By Jacqueline Wen As the effects of climate change continue to escalate, their impacts seem especially noticeable and imminent for humans and other animals. But what about for forests and trees? In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Anna Trugman, an assistant professor in UCSB’s Department of Geography, 

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Maximum CO2 diffusion inside leaves is limited by the scaling of cell size and genome size

By Guillaume Théroux-Rancourt et al. Abstract Maintaining high rates of photosynthesis in leaves requires efficient movement of CO2 from the atmosphere to the chloroplasts inside the leaf where it is converted into sugar. Throughout the evolution of vascular plants, CO2 diffusion across the leaf surface was maximized by reducing the sizes of the guard cells 

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Scientists: Rising CO2 REDUCES Fires…Australian (Global) Fires Were More Common In Colder (Pre-1950s) Climates

By Kenneth Richard The current furor about an alleged connection between climate change, CO2 emissions, and Australian fires finds no support in the scientific literature. According to scientists, rising CO2 concentrations reduce fire ignition and burned area. Further, both global-scale and Australian fires were far more pervasive during the colder Little Ice Age. Here’s what 

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Thank God for tide gauges

By Howard Thomas Brady Between 1764 and 1767 William Hutchison, a mariner who was then Harbour Master at Liverpool in England, carefully recorded the times and heights of high tide at the Liverpool Old Dock. In the 19th Century the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, that was to become the Liverpool Observatory, established state-of-the-art tidal 

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Tiny, but effective

Gelatinous zooplankton makes an important contribution to marine carbon transport They are small, almost transparent, similar to jellyfish, and they occur in the ocean in huge quantities. Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Urochordata belong to the gelatinous plankton communities that are omnipresent in the ocean and are among the primary food sources for more highly developed marine 

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