Peer-reviewed Study: Recent data on plant growth shows a net benefit, not a “social cost” of carbon dioxide emissions

It’s time to revisit the 2009 EPA “Endangerment” finding. The latest peer-reviewed studies show that carbon dioxide emissions are twice as powerful a plant food as previously assumed in the Cost-Benefit analysis of CO2 used by the U.S. Government. As a result, for the next 30 years, the Social Cost of Carbon under reasonable assumptions 

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The Interactive Effects of Elevated CO2 and Tidal Flooding Duration on Two Mangrove Species

Paper Reviewed Jacotot, A., Marchand, C., Gensous, S. and Allenbach, M. 2018. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and increased tidal flooding on leaf gas-exchange parameters of two common mangrove species: Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa. Photosynthesis Research 138: 249-260. Writing as background for their study, Jacotot et al. (2018) say that “future climate change could 

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Explaining the Discrepancies Between Hausfather et al. (2019) and Lewis&Curry (2018)

By Ross McKitrick Challenging the claim that a large set of climate model runs published since 1970’s are consistent with observations for the right reasons. Introduction Zeke Hausfather et al. (2019) (herein ZH19) examined a large set of climate model runs published since the 1970s and claimed they were consistent with observations, once errors in 

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Seeing the Forest AND the Trees: Predicting Forest Responses to Contrasting Climate Change Influences

By Jacqueline Wen As the effects of climate change continue to escalate, their impacts seem especially noticeable and imminent for humans and other animals. But what about for forests and trees? In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Anna Trugman, an assistant professor in UCSB’s Department of Geography, 

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Maximum CO2 diffusion inside leaves is limited by the scaling of cell size and genome size

By Guillaume Théroux-Rancourt et al. Abstract Maintaining high rates of photosynthesis in leaves requires efficient movement of CO2 from the atmosphere to the chloroplasts inside the leaf where it is converted into sugar. Throughout the evolution of vascular plants, CO2 diffusion across the leaf surface was maximized by reducing the sizes of the guard cells 

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